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The Mechanics of Minimalism

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The Mechanics of Minimalism

Sometimes someone’s own profession and artistic interests go hand in hand. At least thematically.

Mechanical engineer Carl-Jürgen Schroth’s passion for geometric forms and smooth surfaces is deeply reflected the Schroth Collection – his art collection of concrete and post-minimal art since the 1950s, with some of the works based upon a strict scientific analysis and mathematical rules, others dealing with the subject of space and dimension.

Behind this seemingly rational collecting philosophy however, lie the deeply personal relations and memories, which are at the heart of every good collection. “Almost every acquisition is accompanied by a small, exciting, sometimes also larger story of discovery; the joy associated with it; a meeting with the artist; occasionally conversations about the conceptual development of contractual work; and the final purchase”, Schroth says about the collection. With his collection, Schroth intends to introduce visitors to analytical observations whilst enjoying the beautiful aesthetic of the reduced, minimalist pieces.

Schroth started to collect art in the 1970s which he hung on his own walls so that he could live with it. Since the late 1980’s Schroth continued to collect artworks even if they did not fit in his living space any longer, thus marking the beginning of his publicly accessible collection. Today a large part of the collection is displayed in the private premises of Schroth, as well as in additional venues such as a former school. “The goal is to find or build permanent premises in the environs of other art-related facilities. Such a site would then allow curatorship of exhibitions with additional artists and works, while almost demanding and also supporting the further development of the collection.”

SPENCER FINCH, Crevasse. Photo: Gerhard Kassner
SPENCER FINCH, Crevasse. Photo: Gerhard Kassner
CALLUM INNES, Untitled No 163 2010. Photo: H. Kosaniuk
CALLUM INNES, Untitled No 163 2010. Photo: H. Kosaniuk
CALLUM INNES, Untitled No 37 10. Photo: H. Kosaniuk
CALLUM INNES, Untitled No 37 10. Photo: H. Kosaniuk
IMI KNOEBEL, Memories, DANIEL BUREN, Photo souvenir: Cadre décadré 15 C3. Photo: Hubert Kemper
IMI KNOEBEL, Memories, DANIEL BUREN, Photo souvenir: Cadre décadré 15 C3. Photo: Hubert Kemper
 ULRICH RÜCKRIEM, Untitled, IMI KNOEBEL, Memories, IMI KNOEBEL, Weißer Winkel 2,  + FRANÇOIS MORELLET, Steel Life #63. Photo: Hubert Kemper
ULRICH RÜCKRIEM, Untitled, IMI KNOEBEL, Memories, IMI KNOEBEL, Weißer Winkel 2, + FRANÇOIS MORELLET, Steel Life #63. Photo: Hubert Kemper
DOUGLAS ALLSOP, 931 round holes, 3,6 and 9mm, square pitch, DOUGLAS ALLSOP, Monochrome Panels, ERICH REUSCH, In Augenhöhe. Photo: Hubert Kemper
DOUGLAS ALLSOP, 931 round holes, 3,6 and 9mm, square pitch, DOUGLAS ALLSOP, Monochrome Panels, ERICH REUSCH, In Augenhöhe. Photo: Hubert Kemper
DOUGLAS ALLSOP, Monochrome Panels, ERICH REUSCH, In Augenhöhe. Photo: Hubert Kemper
DOUGLAS ALLSOP, Monochrome Panels, ERICH REUSCH, In Augenhöhe. Photo: Hubert Kemper
IMI KNOEBEL, Unfinished World. Photo: Hubert Kemper
IMI KNOEBEL, Unfinished World. Photo: Hubert Kemper
ANTON QUIRING, Untitled.
Photo: Ulli Sowa
ANTON QUIRING, Untitled. Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled.
Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled. Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled.
Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled. Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Kommen und gehen. Photo: Christoph Meinschäfer
KLAUS STAUDT, Kommen und gehen. Photo: Christoph Meinschäfer
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled.
Photo: Ulli Sowa
KLAUS STAUDT, Untitled. Photo: Ulli Sowa

Works from the Schroth Collection are currently on view in the exhibition “Präzise Gefühle. Werke aus der Sammlung Schroth” at the Kunstmuseum Ahlen.

The Schroth Collection is included in the Art Guide.