play-small play plyr-enter-fullscreen plyr-exit-fullscreen plyr-muted plyr-pause plyr-play plyr-volume

Berlin  |  Germany  | 

Joe Seaton

Although Joe Seaton’s profession as a DJ makes him an avid collector of records and curator of his own music library, his personal take on collecting transcends the materialistic realm of ownership.

Instead, Joe Seaton’s definition of collecting could be characterised as an ephemeral process of gathering ideas and seeking inspiration within all kinds of creative disciplines – which in turn find their way back into his multi-disciplinary approach to music, art and carefully curated club nights.

Seaton, who has been releasing music under the aliases Call Super, Ondo Fudd and Elmo Crumb since 2011, developed a love for painting in his early childhood. Against the backdrop of releasing his second album Arpo on Fabric’s Houndstooth label, Seaton made 300 ink drawings on 7” sleeves for the single Arpo Low – emphasizing the already omnipresent aspect of records as “collectibles”.

Here, we showcase a selection of Call Super’s project “300 Cuts”, and talk to him about collecting and the role of the artwork in his music.

CALL SUPER, Arpo Low, Strictly Limited Hand Drawn Dinked 7
CALL SUPER, Arpo Low, Strictly Limited Hand Drawn Dinked 7", 2017
IC

Being a DJ naturally makes you a collector; a collector of vinyl. But there is more to music than a vinyl and more to art than a painting, so what do you collect?

JOE SEATON

I have small, much loved collections of ceramics and spectacles. I don’t really count books and clothes – as much as I love them, they have a transience about them. To be perfectly honest there is nothing beyond life’s essentials that I would miss apart from a few books, but they’re all easily replaceable.

IC

For Arpo Low you drew individual ink drawings on 300 7″ record covers, turning them into collectibles. What is the role of the artwork in your music?

JOE SEATON

It has featured on some of my covers but this was the first time I felt like I actually connected the two in a more equal way. Previously, I guess, the music felt like it had greater weight.

IC

You are a producer, dj and painter. Your father is an art professor and musician. How did you grow up with art?

JOE SEATON

Immersed, I guess. The ground floor of our house was his studio. I was dragged around every show my parents went to. I was always asked my opinion and talked to as if I knew anything about anything.

IC

You recently cited Christina Quarles, Katharina Grosse or Jordan Casteel as inspirational and posted about Jon Rafman. What do you like about these artists?

JOE SEATON

Personally I don’t like Jon Rafman as a human very much but that particular exhibition was presented really well. The others are all doing exceptional work that feels vibrant and has its own voice and lots to say about contemporary issues using traditional mediums, which is just so inspiring.

To be perfectly honest there is nothing beyond life’s essentials that I would miss apart from a few books, but they’re all easily replaceable.

Joe Seaton
IC

Besides collecting music, do you also collect visual art?

JOE SEATON

Not massively. I have things that people have kindly given me or I’ve come into over the years but I don’t spend time researching things I want to buy and so on.

IC

This summer Beatrice Dillon – with whom you released a collaborative EP – created  an aural soundscape in response to Jorinde Voigt’s exhibition at Lisson Gallery. Is there a new dialogue between contemporary art and electronic music emerging?

JOE SEATON

You’d have to ask her! I think there have long been connections and projects which engage with both. Clubs have been spaces for art and galleries have presented contemporary music for years.

IC

You are curating a whole weekend at the Amsterdam club De School, for which you programmed the line-up and wrote a short essay in which you announced that you’ll also be doing some site-specific paintings for the party. Do you often look for new ways of incorporating contemporary art into your practice?

JOE SEATON

I invited some friends who are production designers to transform one of the spaces and painted some pictures for different walls. I don’t really think too hard about things but if there’s space to do something and ideas in my head I’ll just try and get them out there.

Call Super, Photo: George Nebieridze
Call Super, Photo: George Nebieridze