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Murat Orozobekov & Edward Winkleman

New York  |  United States of America  | 

Murat Orozobekov & Edward Winkleman

Moving Image, the video based artwork fair in London, New York and Istanbul, has already established a name for itself as one of the most exciting and unconventional satellite art fairs.

Adopting an invite-only policy for participants at the fair, Moving Image invites international commercial galleries and non-profit institutions to present single-channel videos, single-channel projections, video sculptures, and other larger video installations. We speak to the fair directors Murat Orozobekov and Edward Winkleman about Moving Image, the shift towards collecting video art, and where do they think the future of collecting video art is headed.

IC

Moving Image New York happens at the same time of The Armory Show – how do you think the fair benefits from being a satellite fair?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

We have a great relationship with The Armory Show and the other fairs happening in New York during Moving Image. Many of the dealers who present at those other fairs also participate in Moving Image. We envisioned our fair as a complement to the other fairs, so that they could present moving image based artwork in a context created to permit the viewer to slow down. We’re grateful that both the galleries and the other fairs have embraced this model.

IC

Participation for the fair is by invite only, why is this? What advantages does it bring to the fair?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Because film and video are time-based artworks, and there is only so much time anyone can spend at a fair, we chose to limit the number of artworks presented at any Moving Image fair to between 20-30 total. We had tried more than that once but the response from our audience was it was discouraging to not be able to experience the entire fair in a single visit. Because of the small number of artworks, but a goal of a well rounded program for each edition, we opted for an invitation process, to ensure a well-rounded diversity and a global presentation each time.

Collectors who view their collections as a reflection of what's important today recognize it needs to include video to do that.

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
IC

Have you noticed a change in how video art is being approached by collectors?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

We’re seeing more collectors recognize the amount of video artwork shown in museums and biennials, leading them to understand its importance in contemporary art. As a result, the collectors who view their collections as a reflection of what’s important today recognize it needs to include video to do that. We’re also seeing collectors ask really good questions about the rights and responsibilities they have when collecting video art, opening up a wider dialog about the sorts of reservations some previously had about this relatively new and continually evolving medium.

IC

With the conversion to digital, how do you think video art is becoming more accessible to the public and collectors?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Clearly the Internet has revolutionized how video art can be viewed and distributed. With some artists presenting their work both in limited edition installations and for free on YouTube, accessibility is being redefined by video artists perhaps more than artists working in other mediums.

IC

Are you a collector? If so, do you also collect video art?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Yes, we have video in our private collection, about 6 works at this point, but growing.

IC

Where do you see the future of Video Art going?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Wow, that’s a big question. Virtual reality is coming quickly. We’ll see video presented on all manner of substrates. Video as a “moving photograph” seems to be igniting the imagination of a number of artists. Artists better known for working in other medium are increasingly gravitating to using or incorporating moving images in their work. In short, culturally we’re all using moving images to communicate much more than ever before and artists are keeping pace with that.

Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York.  Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
Moving Image New York. Courtesy Moving Image New York
IC

What sets Moving Image apart from other perhaps more commercial art fairs showing video works?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Moving Image is a commercial art fair, but we are not a traditional fair. By dedicating the entire space to film and video, we can make choices that are difficult for other fairs to make, such as darkening big areas within the space, spreading the works out, providing seating for every work, and generally signaling to the viewers that they can slow down and take their time with each piece. The pace, costs, and logistics of more traditional fairs make that more difficult for them.

IC

What are your tips for collectors attending Moving Image New York?

MURAT OROZOBEKOV & EDWARD WINKLEMAN

Wear comfortable shoes and bring your camera phone. While dealers do not hover over collectors generally at Moving Image (so visitors feel more comfortable taking their time watching a work), we do have detailed information about the artwork, artist, and gallery posted next to each work. Many experienced Moving Image collectors snap photos of that text and contact the galleries later to purchase the works. We would also encourage collectors to visit our online catalog (generously sponsored by Artsy) to see excerpts of the works in the fair before arriving, or after they leave, as a handy guide to what’s on view.